Marie Vassiliou

“An arresting musical talent, every note  clearly heard and beautifully tuned. Marie Vassiliou is prized for her technique in challenging contemporary repertoire, but also delightful in the classics, whether soulful or virtuosic.”

Stephen Dodgson, composer & reviewer


 

“Marie Vassiliou brought a strong, richly coloured voice to the cycle and she had a real feel for Joyce’s language…The penultimate song is the climax to the piece and Vassiliou and the ISIS Ensemble gave it a highly charged and dramatic performance.”

Robert Beattie, 2 April 2014 From ‘Seen and Heard International’


 

“she has the dramatic projection and beauty of tone, as of appearance, to become a star.”

 Michael Tanner,  The Spectator


 

“…superbly realised….Poised and controlled, lyric soprano Marie Vassiliou caught the essence of these gnomic, jewelled settings with their Ravelian, even at times Webernian fusion of precision and beauty.  Hercommanding stage presence, clarity of utterance and flexibility of tone made a considerable contribution to the success of this first performance.”

Paul Conway, ‘Tempo’


 

“There is some accomplished singing here, especially from soprano Marie Vassiliou, who phrases…with assured artistry.”

Fanfare


 

‘Vassiliou gave a vividly dramatic and highly involving performance’

Robert Hugill, 29 March 2014 From ‘Planet Hugill’ 


 

“A singer of outstanding accomplishment and charm…we would have assumed from her sympathetic phrasing and projection of material and perfect enunciation-notoriously difficult for non-Gallic performers to achieve- that she was indeed French…This warm and attractive singer.. thrilled us with a performance of ravishing delicacy.”

 Diana Godden and Wendy Cater, Wandsworth Society, Evening of French song


 

“…a rich-sounding Nedda”

Opera magazine


 

“her rich tone and impressive power effortlessly filled a very large gallery, in which sound could easily be lost. She always offers a rewarding as well as enjoyable listening experience, as she is such a strongly communicative performer, conveying the mood of each piece to the obvious delight of the audience.”

 British Harpsichord Society


 

“I saw the soprano Marie Vassiliou give her all as Leila, first appearing behind aquamarine gauze as a silent lady from the sea, then singing in hot flesh and blood. Bizet’s musical exotica flowered from beautifully placed trilling ornaments both in her hymn to Brahma and in her nostalgic Comme d’autrefois.”

 The Times, Hilary Finch


 

 “Marie Vassiliou, her beautiful soprano so impressive in Richard Strauss’s Four Last Songs, and her person hardly less so, was only the second singer to be engaged for a Charnwood Orchestra concert, as far as I can remember…..there is nothing quite like a singer for human contact with the audience…   The audience in St James the Greater, Leicester, was surely fortunate to have heard Vassiliou’s sincere and controlled performance…”

Loughborough Echo


 

“Stand-out performance from the lead player, Marie Vassiliou, as consumptive seamstress Mimi…”

This is Somerset.co.uk/ Cheddar Valley


 

“The vivacious Marie Vassiliou captured splendidly the spirit of Canteloube’s Songs of the Auvergne. Her singing of the Bailero was tinglingly beautiful…”

Gloucestershire Echo


 

“the soprano Marie Vassiliou, who sang ‘Exsultate Jubilate’ with much beauty of tone and elegant phrasing.”

Musical Opinion


 

“It was such a pleasure working with Marie.  Nothing seemed too difficult for her to master technically, and the musical results were spot-on, sensitive, and full of character and life.” “Her performance of the little Spanish song I wrote for her was so special I was promptly moved to write 5 more to form a cycle.”

Anthony Gilbert, composer


 

“… is a wonderful singer with a broad range of experience from early music to contemporary, she has a wonderful voice which can convey a convincing range of emotions; her technique is so sophisticated as to be well nigh invisible… …this is all fantastic stuff for a collaborator, but in addition Marie is a boon as a musician and as a person. She understands music with a depth that many singers don’t approach, I believe she is (quietly) a rather fine fiddle player and her vocal dexterity sometimes resembles a really good instrumentalist’s ease and confidence with virtuosic writing. As a person she is loyal and brave – in ‘Stumbling over Infinity’ she was working with disciplines that are unusual in the context of opera – aerial work and some pretty intense movement, more like contemporary dance. Whether or not these were areas that she had experience of, she had an openness to trying them and a dedication to making them work that was priceless…”

Harvey Brough, musician and composer


 

“Marie Vassiliou is a ‘dream artist’ for a composer. She not only interprets new music with intelligence and insight, but also sings with a beauty of tone that is rare in the field of contemporary music. It is this combination, along with her humility, that mark her out as someone special.”

Richard Chew,  musician & composer


 

“The extraordinary qualities Marie brings to her performance are the result of hard work and an intelligent approach. We have written two roles for her – Desiree, in the opera ‘Jago’,and Mathilda in the (one woman) chamber opera ‘Cape Gloss’. Her musicality and her skills as an actor are exceptional and she comes alight on the stage, sustaining her vocal quality and her intensity of interpretation until the last applause has finally died away.”

Mike Westbrook, composer  Kate Westbrook, librettist


 

“Marie Vassiliou’s rich and warm timbre… an enchanting and magical performance”

The Classical Source


 

“Surprise delights were Marie Vassiliou’s icy Foreign Princess (the vocals felt galvanized every time she uttered…)”

 The Independent


 

“I would single out…a commanding stage presence in the role of the Foreign Princess if Marie Vassiliou”

Opera (Julian Budden)


 

“They were enthralled, and rightly so. The Carmen of Marie Vassiliou had grown immeasurably…and…she could perform the role with distinction anywhere.”

The Spectator